Installation

To install ODAHU services, you need to provide a number of preliminary requirements for it.

In particular:

  • Python 3.6 or higher; to install JupyterLab extension or Odahuflowctl which are interfaces for interacting with Odahu-flow cluster.
  • Kubernetes cluster to perform base and accessory ODAHU services in it, as well as models training, packaging and deployment processes. To be able to use ODAHU services, minimum version of your Kubernetes cluster must be at least 1.16.
  • object storage to store models training artifacts and get input data for models (S3, Google Cloud Storage, Azure Blob storage are supported)
  • Docker registry (to store resulting Docker images from packagers)

Kubernetes setup

Deploy Kubernetes cluster in Google Compute Platform (GKE)

Prerequisites:

  • GCP service account to deploy Kubernetes cluster with and use its credentials for access to object storage and Google Cloud Registry
  • Google Cloud Storage bucket (odahu-flow-test-store in examples below) to store models output data

Run deploy of a new Kubernetes cluster:

$ gcloud container clusters create <cluster-name> \
    --cluster-version 1.13 \
    --machine-type=n1-standard-2 \
    --disk-size=100GB \
    --disk-type=pd-ssd \
    --num-nodes 4 \
    --zone <cluster-region> \
    --project <project-id>

Note

Make sure that the disk size on the cluster nodes is sufficient to store images for all services and packaged models. We recommend using a disk size of at least 100 GiB.

You can enable the GPU on your Kubernetes cluster, follow the instructions on how to use GPU hardware accelerators in your GKE clusters’ nodes.

Fetch your Kubernetes credentials for kubectl after cluster is successfully deployed:

$ gcloud container clusters get-credentials <cluster-name> \
    --zone <cluster-region> \
    --project <project-id>

Deploy Kubernetes cluster in Amazon Web Services (EKS)

Prerequisites

After you’ve created VPC and a dedicated security group for it along with Amazon EKS service role to apply to your cluster, you can create a Kubernetes cluster with following command:

$ aws eks --region <cluster-region> create-cluster \
    --name <cluster-name> --kubernetes-version 1.13 \
    --role-arn arn:aws:iam::111122223333:role/eks-service-role-AWSServiceRoleForAmazonEKS-EXAMPLEBKZRQR \
    --resources-vpc-config subnetIds=subnet-a9189fe2,subnet-50432629,securityGroupIds=sg-f5c54184

Use the AWS CLI update-kubeconfig command to create or update kubeconfig for your cluster:

$ aws eks --region <cluster-region> update-kubeconfig --name <cluster-name>

Deploy Kubernetes cluster in Microsoft Azure (AKS)

Prerequisites

  • Azure AD Service Principal to interact with Azure APIs and create dynamic resources for an AKS cluster
  • Azure Storage account with Blob container (odahu-flow-test-store in examples below) to store models output data

First, create a resource group in which all created resources will be placed:

$ az group create --location <cluster-region> \
    --name <resource-group-name>

Run deploy of a new Kubernetes cluster:

$ az aks create --name <cluster-name> \
    --resource-group <resource-group-name>
    --node-vm-size Standard_DS2_v2 \
    --node-osdisk-size 100GB \
    --node-count 4 \
    --service-principal <service-principal-appid> \
    --client-secret <service-principal-password>

Fetch your Kubernetes credentials for kubectl after cluster is successfully deployed:

$ az aks get-credentials --name <cluster-name> \
    --resource-group <resource-group-name>

Install base Kubernetes services

Install Helm (version 3.1.2)

Install Nginx Ingress

Install nginx-ingress Helm chart:

$ helm install stable/nginx-ingress --name nginx-ingress --namespace kube-system

Get external LoadBalancer IP assigned to nginx-ingress service:

$ kubectl get -n kube-system svc nginx-ingress-controller \
    -o=jsonpath='{.status.loadBalancer.ingress[*].ip}{"\n"}'

Install Istio (with Helm and Tiller)

Note

ODAHU services uses number of Istio custom resources actively, so Istio installation is mandatory.

Add Helm repository for Istio charts

$ helm repo add istio https://storage.googleapis.com/istio-release/releases/1.4.2/charts/

Crate a namespace for the istio-system components

$ kubectl create namespace istio-system

Install the istio-init chart to bootstrap all the Istio’s CustomResourceDefinitions

$ helm install istio/istio-init --name istio-init --namespace istio-system

Ensure that all istio-init jobs have been completed:

$ kubectl -n istio-system get job \
    -o=jsonpath='{range.items[?(@.status.succeeded==1)]}{.metadata.name}{"\n"}{end}'

Install Istio Helm chart with provided values.

Example:

$ cat << EOF > istio_values.yaml
global:
  proxy:
    accessLogFile: "/dev/stdout"
  disablePolicyChecks: false
sidecarInjectorWebhook:
  enabled: true
pilot:
  enabled: true
mixer:
  policy:
    enabled: true
  telemetry:
    enabled: true
  adapters:
    stdio:
      enabled: true
gateways:
  istio-ingressgateway:
    enabled: true
    type: ClusterIP
    meshExpansionPorts: []
    ports:
      - port: 80
        targetPort: 80
        name: http
      - port: 443
        name: https
      - port: 15000
        name: administration
  istio-egressgateway:
    enabled: true
prometheus:
  enabled: false
EOF

$ helm install istio/istio --name istio --namespace istio-system --values ./istio_values.yaml

Add ODAHU Helm charts repository

$ helm repo add odahu https://raw.githubusercontent.com/odahu/odahu-helm/master

Install Knative

Create namespace for Knative and label it for Istio injection:

$ kubectl create namespace knative-serving && \
    kubectl label namespace knative-serving istio-injection=enabled

Install Knative with Helm chart provided by ODAHU team:

$ helm install odahu/odahu-flow-knative --name knative --namespace knative-serving

Install Tekton Pipelines

Create namespace for Tekton:

$ kubectl create namespace tekton-pipelines

Install Tekton Pipelines with Helm chart provided by ODAHU team:

$ helm install odahu/odahu-flow-tekton --name tekton --namespace tekton-pipelines

Install Fluentd with set of cloud object storage plugins

In order to save models training logs to object storage of cloud provider you use, a container with fluentd is used, in which a set of plugins for popular cloud providers’ object storages (AWS S3, Google Storage, Azure Blob) is added. Installation is done using a fluentd Helm chart provided by ODAHU team.

First, create an object storage bucket:

$ gsutil mb gs://odahu-flow-test-store/

Create namespace for Fluentd:

$ kubectl create namespace fluentd

Install Fluentd with specified values. Full list of values you can see in chart’s values.yaml.

Example:

$ cat << EOF > fluentd_values.yaml
output:
  target: gcs
  gcs:
    authorization: keyfile
    bucket: odahu-flow-test-store
    project: my-gcp-project-id-zzzzz
    private_key_id: 0bacc0b0caa0a0aacabcacbab0a0b00ababacaab
    private_key: -----BEGIN PRIVATE KEY-----\nprivate-key-here\n-----END PRIVATE KEY-----\n
    client_email: service-account@my-gcp-project-id-zzzzz.iam.gserviceaccount.com
    client_id: 000000000000000000000
    auth_uri: https://accounts.google.com/o/oauth2/auth
    token_uri: https://oauth2.googleapis.com/token
    auth_provider_x509_cert_url: https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v1/certs
    client_x509_cert_url: https://www.googleapis.com/robot/v1/metadata/x509/service-account%40my-gcp-project-id-zzzzz.iam.gserviceaccount.com
EOF
$ helm install odahu/odahu-flow-fluentd --name fluentd --namespace fluentd --values ./fluentd_values.yaml

Install PostgreSQL (optional)

Create namespace for PostgreSQL:

$ kubectl create namespace postgresql

Install PostgreSQL Operator with Helm chart:

$ helm install postgres-operator/postgres-operator --name odahu-db --namespace postgresql

You must configure your PostgreSQL operator using next values

Parameters to configure PostgreSQL Provider:
$  cat << EOF > postgres.yaml
apiVersion: "acid.zalan.do/v1"
kind: postgresql
metadata:
  name: odahu
  namespace: postgres
spec:
  teamId: "postgres"
  volume:
    size: 10Gi
  numberOfInstances: 2
  users:
    mlflow: []
    jupyterhub: []
    odahu: []
  databases:
    mlflow: mlflow,
    jupyterhub: jupyterhub,
    odahu: odahu
  postgresql:
    version: "12"
  ---
  apiVersion: v1
  kind: Secret
  metadata:
    name: jupyterhub.odahu-db.credentials.postgresql.acid.zalan.do
    namespace: postgres
  type: Opaque
  ---
  apiVersion: v1
  kind: Secret
  metadata:
    name: mlflow.odahu-db.credentials.postgresql.acid.zalan.do
    namespace: postgres
  type: Opaque
  ---
  apiVersion: v1
  kind: Secret
  metadata:
    name: odahu.odahu-db.credentials.postgresql.acid.zalan.do
    namespace: postgres
  type: Opaque

Apply configuration to kubernetes: .. code:: bash

kubectl apply -f postgres.yaml

Install Open Policy Agent (optional)

To activate API authentication and authorization using Security install OpenPolicyAgent (OPA) helm chart with ODAHU built-in policies.

Create namespace for OPA

$ kubectl create namespace odahu-flow-opa

Install OpenPolicyAgent with Helm chart provided by ODAHU team:

$ helm install odahu/odahu-flow-opa --name odahu-flow-opa --namespace odahu-flow-opa

You must configure your OpenID provider (to allow envoy JWT token verifying) using next Helm values

Parameters to configure OpenID provider
# authn overrides configuration of envoy.filters.http.jwt_authn http filter
authn:
  # enabled activate envoy authn filter that verify jwt token and pass parsed data
  # to next filters (particularly to authz)
  oidcIssuer: ""
  oidcJwks: ""
  oidcHost: ""
  localJwks: ""

For information about authn section parameters see docs for envoy authentication filter

By default chart is delivered with built-in policies that implements Role based access system and set of pre-defined roles. To customize some of built-in policies files or define new ones use next Helm values

Parameters to configure built-in policies
opa:
  policies: {}
  #  policies:
    #  file1: ".rego policy content encoded as base64"
    #  file2: ".rego policy content encoded as base64"

Warning

Content of rego files defined in values.yaml should be base64 encoded

Install ODAHU

Install core ODAHU services

Create namespace for core ODAHU service:

$ kubectl create namespace odahu-flow &&\
    kubectl label namespace odahu-flow project=odahu-flow

Create namespaces for ODAHU training, packaging and deployment.

$ for i in training packaging deployment; do \
    kubectl create namespace odahu-flow-${i} &&\
    kubectl label namespace odahu-flow-${i} project=odahu-flow; done

To provision pods in the deployment namespace according to node selectors and toleration from the config you need to label the namespace so the model deployment webhook use it as a target

$ kubectl label namespace odahu-flow-deployment odahu/node-selector-webhook=enabled

Deployment namespace should be also labeled for Istio injection.

$ kubectl label namespace odahu-flow-deployment istio-injection=enabled

Prepare YAML config with values for odahu-flow-core Helm chart.

Example:

$  cat << EOF > odahuflow_values.yaml
logLevel: debug
ingress:
  enabled: true
  globalDomain: odahu.example.com
edge:
  ingress:
    enabled: true
    domain: odahu.example.com
feedback:
  enabled: true
config:
  common:
    external_urls:
    - name: Documentation
      url: https://docs.odahu.org
    databaseConnectionString: postgresql://odahu:PASSWORD@odahu-db.postgresql/odahu
  connection:
    enabled: true
    decrypt_token: somenotemptystring
    repository_type: kubernetes
  deployment:
    edge:
      host: http://odahu.example.com
EOF

Note

This example uses hostname odahu.example.com as entrypoint for cluster services. It should point to LoadBalancer IP got from Nginx Ingress section.

In order to setup ODAHU services along with ready-to-use connections, you may add according section to values YAML in advance.

To support training on GPU, you should provide the GPU node selectors and tolerations:

Example:

Example of Connection GCS:
config:
  training:
    gpu_toleration:
      Key: dedicated
      Operator: Equal
      Value: training-gpu
      Effect: NO_SCHEDULE
    gpu_node_selector:
      mode: odahu-flow-training-gpu

Examples:

  1. Docker registry connection is used to pull/push Odahu packager resulting Docker images to a Docker registry
connections:
- id: docker-hub
  spec:
    description: Docker registry for model packaging
    username: "user"
    password: "supersecure"
    type: docker
    uri: docker.io/odahu-models-repo
    webUILink: https://hub.docker.com/r/odahu-models-repo
  1. Google Cloud Storage connection is used to store model trained artifacts and input data for ML models
connections:
- id: models-output
  spec:
    description: Object storage for trained artifacts
    keySecret: '{ "type": "service_account", "project_id": "my-gcp-project-id-zzzzz", "private_key_id": "0bacc0b0caa0a0aacabcacbab0a0b00ababacaab", "private_key": "-----BEGIN PRIVATE KEY-----\nprivate-key-here\n-----END PRIVATE KEY-----\n", "client_email": "service-account@my-gcp-project-id-zzzzz.iam.gserviceaccount.com", "client_id": "000000000000000000000", "auth_uri": "https://accounts.google.com/o/oauth2/auth", "token_uri": "https://oauth2.googleapis.com/token", "auth_provider_x509_cert_url": "https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v1/certs", "client_x509_cert_url": "https://www.googleapis.com/robot/v1/metadata/x509/service-account%40my-gcp-project-id-zzzzz.iam.gserviceaccount.com" }'
    region: my-gcp-project-id-zzzzz
    type: gcs
    uri: gs://odahu-flow-test-store/output
    webUILink: https://console.cloud.google.com/storage/browser/odahu-flow-test-store/output?project=my-gcp-project-id-zzzzz

If you install Open Policy Agent for ODAHU then you will need to configure service accounts which will be used by ODAHU core background services such as <Trainer> or <Packager>.

All service accounts below require odahu-admin ODAHU built-in role. (see more about built-in roles in security docs)

Next values with service account credentials are required :

values.yaml
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config:
  operator:
    # OpenId Provider token url
    oauth_oidc_token_endpoint: https://oauth2.googleapis.com/token
    # Credentials from OAuth2 client with Client Credentials Grant
    client_id: client-id
    client_secret: client-secret

  trainer:
    # OpenId Provider token url
    oauth_oidc_token_endpoint: https://oauth2.googleapis.com/token
    # Credentials from OAuth2 client with Client Credentials Grant
    client_id: client-id
    client_secret: client-secret

  packager:
    # OpenId Provider token url
    oauth_oidc_token_endpoint: https://oauth2.googleapis.com/token
    # Credentials from OAuth2 client with Client Credentials Grant
    client_id: client-id
    client_secret: client-secret

# Service account used to upload odahu resources via odahuflowctl
resource_uploader_sa:
  client_id: some-client-id
  client_secret: client-secret

# OpenID provider url
oauth_oidc_issuer_url: ""

In this file, we:

  • lines 2-7: configure service account for Operator
  • lines 9-14: configure service account for Trainer
  • lines 16-21: configure service account for Packager
  • lines 24-29: configure service account Kubernetes Job that install some ODAHU Manifests using ODAHU API

Install odahu-flow core services:

$ helm install odahu/odahu-flow-core --name odahu-flow --namespace odahu-flow --values ./odahuflow_values.yaml

Training service (MLFlow)

Prepare YAML config with values for odahu-flow-mlflow Helm chart.

$ cat << EOF > mlflow_values.yaml
logLevel: debug
ingress:
  globalDomain: example.com
  enabled: true
tracking_server:
  annotations:
    sidecar.istio.io/inject: "false"
toolchain_integration:
  enabled: true
EOF

If you install Open Policy Agent for ODAHU then you will need to configure service account for a Kubernetes Job that install some ODAHU Manifests using ODAHU API. This Service account should have role odahu-admin.

Next values with service account credentials are required :

values.yaml
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# Service account used to upload odahu resources via odahuflowctl
resource_uploader_sa:
  client_id: some-client-id
  client_secret: client-secret

# OpenID provider url
oauth_oidc_issuer_url: ""

Install Helm chart:

$ helm install odahu/odahu-flow-mlflow --name odahu-flow-mlflow --namespace odahu-flow \
    --values ./mlflow_values.yaml

Packaging service

If you install Open Policy Agent for ODAHU then you will need to configure service account for a Kubernetes Job that install some ODAHU Manifests using ODAHU API. This Service account should have role odahu-admin.

Next values with service account credentials are required :

values.yaml
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# Service account used to upload odahu resources via odahuflowctl
resource_uploader_sa:
  client_id: some-client-id
  client_secret: client-secret

# OpenID provider url
oauth_oidc_issuer_url: ""

Install odahu-flow-packagers Helm chart:

$ helm install odahu/odahu-flow-packagers --name odahu-flow-packagers --namespace odahu-flow

Install additional services (optional)

In order to provide additional functionality, ODAHU team also developed several Helm charts to install them into Kubernetes cluster. These are:

Delete ODAHU services

To delete and purge Helm chart run:

$ helm delete --purge odahu-flow

To clean up remaining CustomResourceDefinitions execute following command:

$ kubectl get crd | awk '/odahuflow/ {print $1}' | xargs -n1 kubectl delete crd

To purge everything installed in previous steps with single command, run

$ helm delete --purge odahu-flow-packagers odahu-flow-mlflow odahu-flow &&\
  kubectl delete namespace odahu-flow &&\
  for i in training packaging deployment; do \
    kubectl delete namespace odahu-flow-${i} || true; done &&\
  kubectl get crd | awk '/odahuflow/ {print $1}' | xargs -n1 kubectl delete crd &&\
  kubectl -n istio-system delete job.batch/odahu-flow-feedback-rq-catcher-patcher &&\
  kubectl -n istio-system delete sa/odahu-flow-feedback-rq-catcher-patcher &&\
  kubectl -n istio-system delete cm/odahu-flow-feedback-rq-catcher-patch

Conclusion

After successful deployment of a cluster, you may proceed to Quickstart section and learn how to perform base ML operations such as train, package and deploy steps.